Minimalism: A Documentary (good New Year’s Resolution Ideas for everyone)

minimalism

Happy New Year, everyone! Today’s review is of a movie that I actually watched right before Christmas on Netflix. I felt that it would’ve been the perfect antidote to the excess of that holiday. Unfortunately, the excess of that holiday kept me from getting to this blog. But in the spirit of making resolutions, and offering ideas for people looking for resolutions (realistic resolutions: you may say you want to spend more time at the gym, but do you really want to? Do you really want to spend more time on a bench with anonymous sweat? NO! You don’t! Sorry, getting off topic and making up your mind for you), I recommend giving Minimalism: A Documentary about The Important Things (2016) a try.

In fitting with minimalism, this documentary is only 1 hr 19 minutes. It just scratches the surface of a “movement” that decries materialism in favor of less possessions and more life experience. So it’s somewhat odd that perhaps too much time is spent following two former materialists, Joshua Fields Millburn and Ray Nicodemus, as they go on tour promoting their book about minimalism. Of course, it would be more minimalist to just hand out free flyers to people instead of going on and on for a whole book, but hey, even minimalists need to make a living. Despite my snark, these guys are sincere, have good insights into what made them unfulfilled in their professional life, and they meet interesting people along the way. However, they seem to be less interesting than a lot of the other people in the movie who get much less screen time. For example, people familiar with Dan Harris and his book 10 Percent Happier will enjoy hearing about his experiences with mindfulness, but won’t hear anything new of course. I can’t expect the film to delve into the details that a book does, but you feel like they barely scratch the surface when it comes to the connection between minimalism and mindfulness. Sam Harris, a neuroscientist, also gets too little screen time.

Of course, a documentary about minimalism would have to touch on the tiny house movement. If you watch HGTV or DIY channels, you can’t go too long without seeing shows like “Tiny House Hunters” (not good, really. too often hipsters settle for a camper or what is basically just a small apartment). One of the better Tiny House shows is on the DiY channel. I think it’s called “Tiny House, Big Living” but it deals more with the design and building of tiny homes, and it’s inspiring to see the innovative designs that are aesthetically pleasing, yet functional for a tiny space. I bring this up because this movie does touch on the tiny house movement in relation to minimalism, and I think it does an adequate job of explaining what that’s about very succinctly. However, there is an apartment design in New York that is shown ever so briefly, where you see the same space being transformed into a dining room, a bedroom, a living room, and how what is also a closet can be turned into a guest room. Yet there is zero follow up on this design- it’s shown and then the director moves on. I actually think this could be more revolutionary than tiny houses, because having a multifunctional space in an apartment is easier than buying a tiny house, and then finding land to put the tiny house  on (which is not an option for many urban Californians like me).

Somehow this documentary still worked for me, perhaps because of its weakness. By touching the surface only, it feels like a briskly-paced, yet not hyperkinetic, film. I supposed you could go to the website at https://minimalismfilm.com/ and purchase bonus interviews to get more in depth. There’s also a female professor (unfortunately I can’t remember her name) who probably has the best insights of anyone in this film, and also the best one-liner about how kids are inundated with commercials these days that are trying to convince them they need to buy “crap.” As she says this, we’re shown several toy commercials in rapid succession, most all of it stuff I’ve never seen before. I wondered if my Transformers and Star Wars toys were also crap when I was a kid. At least there was some kind of “story” to the commercials that sucked 5-year old Aaron into convincing his parents to GET THEM ALL! Anyhow, her take on how we are not really true “materialistic” people in the sense that we don’t really value the material at all, we value what it symbolizes, is just one of the little moments in this documentary that should make you think, and should make you want to take steps to simplify your life by getting rid of stuff you don’t need or value.

Unless of course you enjoy “crap” as much as the next person. But according to Nicodemus and Milburn, your book collection is okay if it brings you joy. Just don’t overdo it. Luckily, streaming does provide us with the ability to ditch the DVD collection (DVD’s? What are those?) somewhat. You should check this documentary out rather than watching more Fuller House.

IMDB rating: 7 out of 10

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